Posts Tagged ‘1978’

1978 was a monumental year in my life, so much so that I’ve littered this blog with posts about it. (Click here for those.) For the uninitiated: I was 12 when the year dawned, and 13 when it faded to black; and graduated from listening to the oldies to the era’s new music during those 12 months.

This day was a Saturday, the first of the traditional start of summer, Memorial Day Weekend. Which meant I slept later than usual, watched Saturday morning TV while reading the morning newspaper, and…who knows? We likely visited the grandparents, or great-aunts and -uncles. Temperatures were in the 60s for the day. 

In the wider world: As with most of the decade, life could have been better: The unemployment rate was a notch below 6 percent, and inflation clocked in at 7 percent. Even if you had a job, in other words, it was difficult to get ahead. Beyond those pocketbook issues, at the end of the prior month, the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) was discontinued, with the units being integrated into the Army proper. And, though we didn’t know it at the time, the first Unabomber attack took place just two days earlier.

Here’s an entire newscast, complete with commercials, for this day from WJKW in Cleveland:

When it came to popular films and music, America had been gripped by a “Night Fever” for much of the winter and spring thanks to Saturday Night Fever and the Bee Gees. But “Disco Inferno” was slowly subsiding. Among the movies in the theaters this weekend: FM; I Wanna Hold Your Hand; The End; The Buddy Holly Story; and Thank God It’s Friday. And among the songs on the radio…

Yep, you guessed it. Here’s today’s Top 5: May 27, 1978 (via Weekly Top 40).

1) Wings – “With a Little Luck.” The single concludes its two-week run at the top of the charts. I featured the music video for it a few weeks back, so here’s something a tad different: the 1978 UK DJ promo 45. I know some folks hear the song as lightweight, but I hear it as great: A commercial for the London Town album that featured the song spurred me to begin investigating new music, after all.

2) Johnny Mathis & Deniece Williams – “Too Much, Too Little, Too Late.” The oeuvres of these artists are blind spots for me, and unlike the other songs in this week’s chart, I have no memory of this specific song, which clocks in at No. 2. According to Wikipedia, Mathis is the third best-selling artist of the 20th century, behind only the Beatles and Frank Sinatra; and Williams, who has a four-octave range, would go on to win a Grammy in 1987.

3) John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John – “You’re the One That I Want.” The week’s No. 3 single is another song that I never grow tired of. Grease wouldn’t open for a few weeks, so it’s success, thus far, was due to its own charms.

4) Andy Gibb – “Shadow Dancing.” To my ears, the No. 4 sounds a lot like Andy’s older brothers, the Bee Gees. But that’s a conclusion I’ve come to after only a few cursory listens.

5) Roberta Flack & Donnie Hathaway – “The Closer I Get to You.” Rounding out the Top 5 is this sweet love song.

And two bonuses…

6) The O’Jays – “Used Ta Be My Girl.” One of the week’s power plays is this propulsive ode about a lost love, which jumps from No. 54 to 44.

7) Steve Martin – “King Tut.” Debuting on the charts is this catchy novelty tune, which still makes me laugh. Here he is on Saturday Night Live performing it…

Ah, 1978. I remember it well. But I have no memory of ever having seen or read this magazine, a bi-monthly that, due to the lack of advertisements within its pages, looks like it attempted to subsist on subscriptions and newsstand sales. There’s a full-page ad for Carole King’s Welcome Home album on the inside front cover; another full-page ad on the inside back cover for YSL Records, which specializes in Japanese imports; and there’s an ad on the back for Intensive Care, an album by jazz musicians Louie Bellson, Ray Brown and Paul Smith that’s billed as “the first audiophile release from Discwasher Records.”

Beyond that? There’s a half-page “classified” section that charges 50 cents a word; and this Akai-infused subscription pitch:

The magazine itself, as the subhead promises, offers “in-depth coverage of rock, jazz and classical music.” Here’s the contents page:

And, with that, here’s today’s Top 5: October 1978 (via Record Review Magazine).

1) The Rolling Stones – “Miss You.” Jon Sutherland thinks much of the Stones’ Some Girls album, which he says is “the most sweeping and powerful Stones production since Sticky Fingers” and “their finest album in nearly a decade.” He also takes a shot at the punk scene: “The Stones created the spirit the punks are now borrowing, but the punks don’t have the touch of the masters.” Ouch!

Sutherland concludes his love-fest with “[t]he Stones started the trend toward hard rock and the tenacious comment that goes with it. No one does it any better. Probably, no one ever will. The Rolling Stones are the greatest rock and roll band in the world and Some Girls is a reconfirmation of that fact.”

2) Cheap Trick – “Surrender.” Page 11 features Record Review Interview: Cheap Trick, by Boni Johnson, which mixes critical insights with quotes from Rick Nielsen. Of this song, Johnson writes that it’s “as definitive of the Cheap Trick sound as anything they’ve recorded. The melodic guitar lead, strong hooking chorus line, the dash of pop sensibility, and the simple instrumentation are all evident.”

The band had yet to break big in the States, though they had overseas. “In Japan, we’ve done very well. ‘Clock Strikes Ten’ and ‘I Want You to Want Me’ (both from In Color) were hits and we’ve scored gold albums, but it’s just a matter of time before it happens in America too,” according to Nielsen.

That time came the following year, of course, after their at Budokan live album was released.

3) Bob Dylan – “Where Are You Tonight?” Michael Davis weighs in on Bob Dylan’s legacy as well as the bard’s latest album, Street Legal. “There are those who consider Dylan close to a god, and others who regard him as a has-been with the majority somewhere in between. That he should inspire such a wide disparity of views should come as no surprise since the man has followed his changeable muse throughout the last two decades…”

Of the album itself, Davis concludes “I’m a little disappointed, but there are rewarding tracks here. That doesn’t mean I’m going to stop listening to the ones that puzzle me; I know Dylan’s music well enough by now to know that the pieces don’t necessarily fall together at the beginning.”

4) Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band – “The Promised Land.” Davis also tackles Springsteen’s third album, Darkness on the Edge of Town, his first since 1975 due to a legal fight with his former manager, Mike Appel. “It appears that he was determined not to lose touch with the streets that inspired most of his songs,” writes Davis. “But of course that environment changed for him. The people that he draws his material from in Darkness on the Edge of Town are no longer street urchins, hanging out on the boardwalks and endlessly cruising and fighting their time away. They are working men who put in 40-hour weeks at jobs that slowly eat away at them, and though they try to ease their frustrations through love relationships with women and competitive relationships with other men, they are only partially successful.”

This song, says Davis, exemplifies “Bruce’s vision of working life existence.”

5) Buffalo Springfield – “Rock & Roll Woman.” Richard Nisley delves into the short but storied catalog of one of greatest rock bands of the 1960s, Buffalo Springfield. The band “had  a string of hits in the second half of the last decade, among them ‘For What It’s Worth,’ ‘Bluebird’ and ‘Uno Mundo,’” explains Nisley. “But they are better remembered for having Stephen Stills, Neil Young, and for their last album, Jimmy Messina, as members. Each went on to become a superstar in his own right, a status the band never achieved. Not that it didn’t have the chance; what it needed was time. The band was together about two years and had another year passed it likely would have emerged from the pack that included the Jefferson Airplane and the Byrds as the country’s top rock group.” Perhaps. Perhaps not.

And in the end…there’s this preview of a surefire box-office hit…

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IMG_0283August 1978 wasn’t as hot as some months in the Delaware Valley. As this Weather Underground summary shows, the average temperature was 79 degrees, Fahrenheit. It eked into the 90s on nine occasions, topping out at 91, and plummeted into the 60s during seven overnights. It also rained on 14 days, though only two were true soakers – the first brought 1.16 inches and the second brought 2.34 inches.

For me, a newly minted teenager (I turned 13 the previous month), that likely meant I spent more days inside than out. In addition to being obsessed about music, I was obsessed with TV – so I survived. I also read a fair bit in those days, so I’m sure I spent a fair chunk of time in my room, stereo on and Stephen King novel in my hand.

Hot movies that summer included Grease, Jaws 2, Heaven Can Wait, The Cheap Detective, Hooper and Animal House; I wouldn’t see Animal House for a few years, and have yet to see Jaws 2, but otherwise I saw ‘em all in the theaters. My hometown of Hatboro, Pa., in those days, had its own single-screen movie theater; and the Village Mall in Horsham, which was something of a home away from home, housed a theater with two screens.

August 1978 was also the month that Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band first headlined New York City’s famed Madison Square Garden.

In the wider world: The U.S. unemployment rate, as it did for most of the year, hovered around 6 percent, but the wage- and allowance-killer that is inflation continued to threaten the average consumer’s purchasing power. From August to September of that year, inflation was gauged at .76 percent. That may sound like chump change, and in the abstract it is, but the reality is different. The inflation rate for 1978 as a whole clocked in at 7.62 percent, which meant that even with a typical 3-5 percent pay raise, folks ended the year with less spending money in their wallets.

Anyway, enough of the intro – onward to today’s Top 5: August 1978 (via Creem).

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1) Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band – “Hollywood Nights.” Bob Seger graces the cover of this issue of Creem. There’s an excellent, in-depth article written by one Patrick Goldstein about him, his entry into the big time with Night Moves, and his new album, Stranger in Town. “[It] was actually finished last November, but then, at the last minute, we scrapped it ‘cause it just didn’t feel right,” Seger explains.

An excerpt: “If there was ever a decade custom-made for the survival of the fittest, it is the ‘70s. It’s not a time for heroes, but for mood jewelry and digital watches. The most inspiring rock albums of the decade, Seger’s Night Moves, Springsteen’s Born to Run and Graham Parker’s Howlin’ Wind, sensing this bleak state of affairs, have turned their back on the present, preferring to explore remembrances of things past.

“This has has always been the most satisfying rock dream, to glorify the passions and pitfalls of adolescence, be it Parker’s yearning to go back to schooldays, Springsteen’s boys on the backstreets who ‘try to look so hard’ or Seger’s bittersweet tributes to ‘the memories that made me a wealthy soul.’

“This isn’t cheap nostalgia. It’s a way of facing up to all our missed opportunities and unfulfilled fantasies. Night Moves is a loving evocation of the wild and furious innocence of youth, jammed like a rush-hour freeway with proud, haunting reminiscences of ‘awkward teenage blues.’ Obviously, this stark and sentimental imagery hit a raw nerve. Night Moves quickly slipped into the pop lexicon, lending its name to a New York City sex club as well as at least one newspaper rock column (and Springsteen fanatics might re-examine the lyrics to ‘Jungleland’ for the Boss’s own melodramatic turn of the phrase).”

IMG_0286In the review section, there’s a write-up of Stranger in Town by one “Robot A. Hull” that recognizes it’s not as good an outing as Night Moves yet is still damn good. “Critically, this LP may cause nary a ripple, but no one can argue that Seger has become lazy and weighted down by platinum, for his approach is still dead ahead w/lotsa elbow grease.”

“Hollywood Nights,” the song I’ve chosen to feature here, is one of my favorite Seger numbers – written, the article informs us, while he was in L.A. mixing Stranger in Town and hanging out with longtime friend (and onetime backup singer) Glenn Frey. It’s a great song for driving.

IMG_02872) Paul McCartney & Wings – “London Town.” There’s a good interview with Paul by Roy Carr. Among the subjects discussed: his enjoyment of some New Wave artists. Says Paul: “I quite like Elvis Costello. I like Nick Lowe because I’ve known him for a very long time. I really do like what they’re doing…being a bit more adventurous.”

A quote about his old band: “To me, the Beatles are just old newspaper clippings. The fact that people still live it out is just a compliment to me.”

And this exchange about that year’s Wings album, London Town:

CREEM: If anything, there’s a subtle psychedelic undercurrent on many cuts. Some of the arrangements can be traced back to Sgt. Pepper and the White Album.

McCARTNEY: I suppose we were going for that kind of feel by doing more complex arrangements but I’m not about to analyze it. Next time around we’ll go for a bit more sweat. Really, it’s down to writing sweaty numbers and, believe me, they’re the hardest of the lot to write.

The whimsical title track is one of the songs with the “subtle psychedelic undercurrent” that Roy Carr refers to, I think.

IMG_02893) Patti Smith – “Because the Night.” There aren’t many female artists mentioned in this issue, which isn’t much of a surprise. Women were often given short shrift in the pages of music magazines – not just because of the editorial slants, but because most women were shepherded into the realm of pop or the singer-songwriter genre, which didn’t (always) get as much coverage in rock-oriented periodicals. Rock ’n’ roll itself was primarily seen (and heard) as the domain of men, which explains why a wealth of generic rock bands – Starz, Status Quo, Foghat and that ilk – were afforded plenty of ink. Oh, sure, there were exceptions to that rule – there always are – but it would take another generation or two before women rockers really got their due. That said, there is this full-page ad for Patti Smith’s classic Easter LP: “It’s the album rock & roll has been waiting for. Featuring the hit single ‘Because the Night.’ Written by Patti Smith and Bruce Springsteen.”

IMG_02914) Carly Simon – “You Belong to Me.” Speaking of female singer-songwriters, here’s one of my favorites, though she’s not mentioned in a positive light. Robert Christgau has a fairly snide take on Boys in the Tree, Carly’s seventh studio album: “Carly generally makes a marriage seem more boring and more nasty than I’ve found it to be, but not on this album, where matrimony is abandoned for more adolescent subjects, Even the two please-don’t-cheat-oh-hubby songs – the better (and nastier) of them written by Carly’s hubby – can be interpreted by her younger fans as please-don’t-cheat-oh-boyfriend. In a way, this is too bad – if Carly were to come up with an interesting song about marriage, someone less conventional musically than Carly & Arif might cover it and give Carole and me something new to sing along to. John and Yoko, where are you now that we need you?”

His opinion notwithstanding, “You Belong to Me” is a good-great song. Written by Carly and Michael McDonald, it was first recorded by the Doobie Brothers on their 1977 Livin’ on a Fault Line album, released as a single and stalled out on the charts at No. 79. A year later, Carly released her own rendition, which hit No. 6.

IMG_02935) The Kinks – “Misfits.” Reviewer Rick Johnson dislikes the Kinks’ 17th studio album. “The Kinks have a long and tired history of chronic disappointment,” he writes. “Since shortly after they began their temporary stay with RCA Snail, they’ve been putting out one come-as-you-are album after another, each one watery enough to float on styrofoam.”

Of the album itself, he opines that “Ray Davies did write a great melody here – the title cut – but the rest of these tunes are plain clothes at best. You get little hints of his stabbed-sweetly melodic turns here and there (‘Perm Waves,’ ‘R&R Fantasy’) but that’s all. A lick and a promise ain’t what I call a great songwriter. As for Davies’ voice, it’s still functioning, but except for some tiny flicks of defiance in ‘Get Up,’ well, let’s just say that George and Roger are probably fluffing up his pillow at the Old Voices Home right now.”

Granted, Misfits is far from a five-star album, but – to my ears, at any rate – the title cut and “Rock & Roll Fantasy” are great songs.

IMG_0005When January 1978 began, I was 12 and far from a music freak. I owned a few bargain-bin Elvis Presley LPs that collected the King’s movie music along with his Golden Records collection, The Monkees Greatest Hits, a two-LP Donny & Marie collection and the soundtrack to The Spy Who Loved Me, along with a handful of singles by Jan & Dean. The untimely death of the king of rock ’n’ roll, Elvis Presley, in August ’77 kickstarted something, but most of my time was spent on other pursuits – TV, the movies, pro wrestling and comic books, primarily.

America, that winter, was limping along: 1977 ended with unemployment at 7.1 percent and inflation at 6.5 percent. Jimmy Carter was president. The biggest movie of the previous year was Star Wars, and other popular films included Smokey & the Bandit, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Goodbye Girl, The Spy Who Loved Me and Saturday Night Fever. The last film, thanks to its Bee Gees-laden soundtrack, pushed the disco craze over the top.

The Bee Gees eventually became one of the main targets of the disco backlash, but at the crack of dawn on January 1st, 1978 – a Sunday – they were ensconced atop the charts with “How Deep Is Your Love.”

“Baby Come Back” by Player would displace it a week later, but no matter – by the start of the next month, they’d be at No. 1 again with “Stayin’ Alive.” Other popular songs that New Year included Linda Ronstadt’s “Blue Bayou,” Dolly Parton’s “Here You Come Again,” Debby Boone’s “You Light Up My Life,” Paul Simon’s “Slip-Sliding Away”…and Shaun Cassidy’s “Hey Deanie.” (The year’s week-by-week charts can be found here.)

IMG_0015Not that you’d know any of that from this issue of Trouser Press. Billed as “America’s Only British Rock Magazine,” it opens with a note from editor-in-chief Ira A. Robbins: “For those of us permanently afflicted with a fascination for the rock ’n’ roll business (as something totally detached from the music), this is an amazingly interesting time to be alive. The first attempts by U.S. companies to import new wave bands are vying with and against home-grown groups trying to win acceptance in their own backyards. The first half of 1978 is the make-or-break time for p*nk rock in America because U.S. companies know their limits when it comes to developing new trends in music: they’ll go as far as it takes to decide how much (or little) money there is to be made, and base their future involvement on the early results.”

IMG_0007There’s also a reader’s poll of the best LPs of all time. Who’s Next tops it, followed by Ziggy Stardust, the White Album, Sgt. Pepper and…The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway by Genesis?! Genesis scores an impressive three additional albums on the list, too, including the Gabriel-less A Trick of the Tail; solo Gabriel scores one, too. I’ve never been much of a Genesis fan, but that seems about right for that time and place. Some punk/new wave make the cut, too, but so does – as evidenced by the Gabriel-era Genesis – a preponderance of progressive rock. ELP’s Brain Salad Surgery rates higher than the Clash’s self-titled debut. (To see the entire list, click on the image.)

Anyway, onward to today’s Top 5: January 1978 (circa Trouser Press).

IMG_00091) Suzi Quatro – “Devil Gate Drive.” My introduction to Suzi Quatro wasn’t that different from most of America: on consecutive Tuesday nights in November 1977, when she guest starred on Happy Days. The Detroit-born rocker found success in England in the early/mid ‘70s, and would score a hit in the U.S. in 1979 with “Stumblin’ In,” but – for a generation of kids – she’ll always be know as Leather Tuscadero, the kid sister of Fonzie’s one-time flame Pinkie.

IMG_00112) The Jam – “In the City.” There’s an excellent article about the Brit band by Robbins. It opens with: “Try calling Paul Weller of the Jam a punk rocker, and find out how icy a cold stare can be.  The intense young man who fulfills the Townshend role in England’s only mod new wave band has very definite ideas about the Jam, and punkdom plays no part therein.”

IMG_00123) Graham Parker & the Rumour – “Stick to Me.” Parker sits for an interview about his third album, Stick to Me. The initial, month-long recordings for the album had to be scrapped due to a serious mishap, as the rocker explains: “We did the whole thing and it sounded absolutely great. When we went to mix it, the power didn’t come out. We went to another studio and they said there’s something wrong with the bottom frequencies, some fault with the studio.” So back into the studio they went, with Nick Lowe as producer, and they banged out the album in about a week.

The interviewer, Jon Young, mentions that he hears Motown influences on the first two albums. Parker agrees, to an extent: “Definitely the power of some of that stuff. I mean, you couldn’t say we sounded like a soul band, but the dynamics of that are something we learned.”

“I think it’s much more valid than Bruce Springsteen,” comments Young.

“I don’t know about that,” responds Parker. “I’m a fan of his. I can’t wait for his new album, whenever he gets it together. He’s done loads of tracks.” (That album-in-the-making, of course, was Darkness on the Edge of Town.)

IMG_00134) David Bowie – “Heroes.” John Walker delves deep into Bowie and Bowie lore in his review of the Heroes album, opening with: “If David Bowie ever conceded that his origins were extraterrestrial, I think the announcement would carry about as much impact as his earlier admission of his own bisexuality. People would ‘ooooh’ and ‘ahhhh’ for a bit, then it would be cool to admit that you were from another planet; finally the Western world would assimilate the outer space culture. Eventually Bloomingdale’s would offer a line of antennae.”

Of the song “Heroes,” he writes that it “could be Dream #1. It too offers no promise of physical permanence – ‘Though nothing will keep us together/we can beat them/for ever and ever’ – but ‘we can be Heroes/just for one day.’ The persistent set of quotation marks surrounding the title indicates some sort of neo-realistic perspective that acknowledges a context greatest that the world of celebrities.”

The review ends with: “I suggest you buy two copies. Listen to one and bury the other in the garden. See what happens.”

IMG_00175) The Clash – “White Riot.” In Brian Hoggs’ “Ramblings” column, he mentions/reviews a Clash concert. “…Joe Strummer had spent most of the day in bed, trying to shake a throat infection. (He’d collapsed twice the night before in Glasgow.) It was a miracle that the show was on; two other places had refused to let the Clash play. But they came; Joe screamed ‘London’s Burning’ and everything else was forgotten. Mick Jones’s guitar work gets better and better, spitting and spilling solos. Paul Simonon’s bass is tight and Nicky Headon is a perfect drummer for the group, forcing and cutting into the rhythm. But your eyes fall back on Strummer. Sometimes he plays guitar, smashing into the sound, sometimes he doesn’t, but leans and screams into the mike. Sometimes he stands just stares and twinkles.”

The piece concludes thusly: “The Clash finished their set with a ‘White Riot’ that had eight times the power of the album and single version put together. It showed how far the group as progressed even with their older material. It also reminded me of when the 45 first came out and how the Clash has possibly become the most vital and exciting British group in years.”