Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Neville’

Not long after graduating high school, Tony Joe White (1943-2018) moved from rural Louisiana, where he’d been raised on a cotton farm, to Marietta, Ga., where a sister lived, in pursuit of a better life. He played guitar and, from what I gather, had been in and out of bands back home, but it didn’t pay the bills – as it often doesn’t. He found employment as a dump-truck driver with the highway department, and it featured an odd perk: work was always called on account of rain.

Fast-forward a few years, by which point he’s kicking around the music circuit in Texas: He hears Bobbie Gentry’s “Ode to Billie Joe” on the radio, and it seems lifted from his own life, just about, inspiring him to try his hand at writing songs. Among the first out of the gate: “Polk Salad Annie,” which harkens back to his childhood, and “Rainy Night in Georgia,” which conjures the rainy nights he experienced in Marietta.

If he’d never written anything else, he would have contributed more to this world than most. “Polk Salad Annie” was covered by Elvis Presley. And “Rainy Night in Georgia”… it’s one of the greatest songs of all time. But no version – not even White’s, which sounds tentative to my ears – equals that of Brook Benton’s masterful single, which went to No. 4 on the pop charts and No. 1 on the R&B charts in 1970. The texture of the veteran R&B singer’s voice was made for White’s melancholic lyrics. 

That said, Shelby Lynne included a spellbinding rendition of it (as “Track 12”) on her 2005 Suit Yourself album. The grain of her voice echoes the rain, and I’d place it almost on a par with Benton’s rendition. (White plays on the track with her; they were neighbors for a spell, and friends – he appears in her recent film, Here I Am.)

The great Chuck Jackson released a version not long after Benton on what would be his final Motown album, Teardrops Keep Fallin’ on My Heart: 

B.J. Thomas also released a version of it in late 1970 on his Most of All album:

Johnny Rivers also recorded it that year:

Ray Charles covered it on his 1972 album The Genius Hits the Road:

Two years after Ray, Van McCoy (yes, of the “Hustle” fame) and his Soul City Symphony recorded an instrumental version of it for the Love Is the Answer LP. (It’s far more kitsch than cool.)

Otis Rush released his rendition of it in 1976, on his Right Place, Wrong Time album.

In 1981, Randy Crawford included a nice version of it on her Secret Combination album. Although released  as a single, it didn’t chart in the U.S.; it did make it to No. 18 in the U.K., however. 

Conway Twitty and Sam Moore recorded the classic tune for the 1993 Rhythm, Country and Blues compilation CD. 

In 2004, David Ruffin’s rendition – which was recorded in 1970 – was released on the David CD. 

And, finally, Aaron Neville – with an ample assist from Chris Botti – covered the song on his Bring It On Home collection of soul classics.

Those are but some of the many versions of the classic tune, of course, and I’m sure I missed some that others think of as must-listens. (About the only person who never recorded it, but should have: Gladys Knight.)

smokey_linda

Diane and I watched Smokey Robinson: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize on PBS this past Friday night. In my estimation, it was a good, not great, affair, due primarily to the lack of A-list talent on hand to sing Robinson’s classic songs. Then, this morning, Diane started a Facebook thread for folks to post favorite Smokey performances –

I posted the first clip below, Smokey’s 1983 duet with Linda Ronstadt on the Motown 25 TV special. I just find it a fantastic performance, with both obviously thrilled to be singing with the other. And me being me, that clip quickly led me down the YouTube rabbit hole in search of other cool Linda duets – of which there are a figurative ton. Here’s a few:

1) With Smokey Robinson – “Ooo Baby Baby” & “Tracks of My Tears.”

2) With Johnny Cash – “I Never Will Marry.”

3) With Aaron Neville – “Don’t Know Much.”

4) With Bonnie Raitt – “Blowing Away.”

5) With the Muppets – “Shoop Shoop Song (It’s in His Kiss).”

And two bonuses – one cool and one kitsch. (I’ll let you decide which is which.)

6) With Hoyt Axton – “Lion in Winter.”

7) With Cher – “Drift Away” & “Rip It Up.”