Posts Tagged ‘I Knew You When’

I worked from home last Thursday, as I sometimes do. If there’s a chance of snow, or it has snowed, or (as in this case) if Diane and I have a show to go to that night, or if the weatherman is predicting heavy rain, the odds are good that my morning commute will consist of me fighting the traffic from the Keurig machine in our kitchen to here, our second-floor study. Most days, my work consists of banging away on a computer keyboard; the need to be in office is often nil (though it’s always better to be seen than not). This day, however, I also had a meeting so – at the appropriate time – I clicked a Skype link to join in.

The reason I mention it: Those who Skype into my company’s meetings are greeted with our head shots from our company ID cards; they’re visible to everyone in attendance, both in the conference room and online. In my case, it’s a photo that was taken in the mid-2000s; as now, I have long blondish-brown hair and a mustache and beard. Unlike these days, however, there’s nary a white or gray whisker on my upper lip, cheeks and chin.

That’s a long-winded way to say that I was reminded, yet again, that my internal clock is tick-tick-ticking closer to midnight.

There’s a well-documented disconnect between how people perceive time and the reality that is the static measurement based on the Earth’s revolutions around the sun. A month lasts forever when we’re young, for instance, but seemingly blurs by at ever-increasing speeds the older we become. And when looking back, the flawed internal workings of recall come into play. Often, the time between now and then doesn’t seem quite as long as it is. It was just yesterday, right? Other times, even with more recent memories, it might seem like a lifetime ago.

As regular readers know, I sometimes dig through my old desk diaries, excavate old rock magazines, and drill into my brain’s medial temporal lobe (where most memories are stored) for my musings. I’m accustomed to dealing with the figurative distance between the present and past, and in peeling away the nostalgic layers of memory to present life as it was – well, as much as I can in a few hundred words.

But seeing a picture of myself pretty much as I still look, just minus wide swaths of white and gray in my beard? That’s a proverbial slap in the face from the original time lord, Chronos.

And, on that cheerful note, here’s today’s Top 5: My Back Pages.

1) Bob Dylan – “My Back Pages.” From Bob-fest, with Roger McGuinn, Tom Petty, Neil Young, Eric Clapton and George Harrison, but originally found on Dylan’s 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan.

2) Dusty Springfield – “Goin’ Back.” In 1966 and ‘67, Dusty starred in two seasons of the Dusty TV series on the BBC. In ’68, she moved to ITV for It Must Be Dusty, then returned to the BBC for Decidedly Dusty in 1969. Each episode of each series followed the same pattern: Dusty sang, welcomed a guest, and then sang some more. Some episodes of Dusty are available on DVD, but – sadly – the tapes for many episodes were either erased or misplaced. The audio has survived fo some, however, including of this beautiful rendition of “Goin’ Back” from 1966.

3) Kasey Chambers – “We’re All Gonna Die Someday.” From Kasey’s classic 1999 debut, The Captain. Sometimes you just gotta laugh about our end times.

4) The Chromatics – “Into the Black.” I first heard this cover of Neil Young’s “Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)” via an episode of what was one of my favorite TV shows, Covert Affairs, in 2012. It’s a haunting rendition.

5) Neil Young & Crazy Horse – “Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black).” And here’s Neil riding the Horse on the same song, from the Rust Never Sleeps album.

And a few bonuses…

6) Bob Seger – “I Knew You When.” The title track from Seger’s most recent album. “We all sit here with our memories/of a glorious long ago…”

7) Steely Dan – “Hey Nineteen.” “Hey nineteen/No, we got nothing in common/No, we can’t talk at all…”

And finally…

8) Courtney Marie Andrews – “Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You.” Nah, not a song about death, growing old, or looking back. Just a great Dylan song by a young(er) artist who knows her music history…

lindaronstadt_1978Yesterday afternoon, I found myself searching for several hours through boxes upon boxes – no, not at the Archives, but in our attic. When we moved from the apartment to the house in early 2014, I think everyone but us was surprised at just how much stuff we had accumulated through the years, with the vast majority of it being things that most folks would have churned into the second-hand market (or trash) long ago. I’m talking books, books and more books, plus CDs, magazines and assorted odds and ends, knick-knacks of every sort.

I didn’t find what I was looking for – Linda Ronstadt’s excellent memoir, Simple Dreams – but did come away with a few things of interest, including a September 1981 Circus, October 1980 Trouser Press, a November 1978 magazine called New Wave Rock and, as seen to the left, the 1978 Rolling Stone with Linda Ronstadt on the cover. I’d forgotten that we had it. The last led me, a little bit later, to sift through quite a few of the Linda clips on YouTube, including this one distributed by Reelin’ Through the Years Productions:

And this one, which lifts her performances of “Tumblin’ Dice,” “Poor Poor Pitiful Me” and “Love Me Tender” from the FM movie:

So, for today’s Top 5: Linda Ronstadt, Volume II. (Volume I can be found here, though some of the chosen clips have since gone AWOL from YouTube.)

1) “Desperado.” Linda covers the classic Eagles’ song while backed by the Eagles, who came to be after Glenn Frey and Don Henley became friends while serving in Linda’s backup band. This clip hails from 1974; the song is from her 1973 album Don’t Cry Now.

2) “Hey Mister That’s Me Up on the Jukebox.” The James Taylor-written song comes her sixth LP, Prisoner in Disguise, which was released in September 1975. This performance, if the notes are correct, hails from December of that same year. (The video goes wonky at the 1:48 mark, but is cool to watch up until then.)

3) “Blue Bayou.” Linda’s cover of the Roy Orbison classic hails from her 1977 album, Simple Dreams. The concert was shot in Atlanta that year.

4) “I Knew You When.” From her oft-overlooked 1982 album, Get Closer. The Joe South-penned song was a hit for Billy Joe Royal in 1965.

5) “Lies”/“Tell Him.” And a twofer from Get Closer: covers of the Knickerbockers’ “Lies” and the Exciters’ “Tell Him.”

And two bonuses…

This seductive rendition of Jimmy Webb’s “Easy for You to Say,” also from Get Closer

…and Linda’s delightful 1986 Tonight Show appearance promoting For Sentimental Reasons, the final part of her Nelson Riddle trilogy, and the Round Midnight box set, which collected all three of the LPs.